Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Despite the problems, an Afghan girl gets the highest marks for university exams



The challenge of justice and all the difficulties, Afghan young girls from Kabul have increased their entrance examinations across the country 'Kankoor' to have strong sayings about the power of women in countries that were destroyed in war.

Tehmeena Painda, a private school student in Kabul, has left more than 150,000 men - boys and girls - to make sure the top channel gets 353 out of 360 points for a public university entrance exam.

In the discussion with The Globe Post, Tehmeena thanked his parents and teachers for amazing achievements.

"I've been working hard in my education for success, but it's not possible without the support of my school, my teacher, and my parents."

Tehmeena wants to continue her education and serve her country as a doctor. According to rules and regulations, the Afghan Higher Education Ministry has enrolled at the University of Kabul Education, where she will continue to seek knowledge.

Tehmeena's success has brought into the focus of the Afghan girl's intentions and the opportunities available to her in the capital. However, Africa is also a serious danger, especially for girls seeking higher education.

The challenge of justice and all the difficulties, Afghan young girls from Kabul have increased their entrance examinations across the country 'Kankoor' to have strong sayings about the power of women in countries that were destroyed in war. Tehmeena is particularly grateful to the Afghan-Turk School, a private school chain in the country, for her achievements.

Even in places like Jalalabad, less than two hours away from Kabul, which saw peace after the Taliban threatened to end, dozens of schools were closed last month following the threat of warlords.

Hasieb Shenwari, head of the provincial education department, said without realizing that diplomats had been warned, saying the school was shut down because of "security threats".

According to the school guidance, almost eighty schools for boys and girls were shut down before summer breaks. The shutdown took place while a distributed book was held in the province between Africa's capital and Pakistan's belt, warning local residents not to send girls to school.

The warning was clearly stated that the girls' schools teaching "illiterate courses around the world" would come under "loud and explosive assaults."

Threats to attack the capital of the capital this month have resulted in many deaths and affects the country.

Tehmeena, however, believes that girls should have confidence in God and in themselves to find the subject.

"I believe girls can learn and learn like boys, no difference, the brain is the same, and so girls should try and work hard to succeed in life."

Earlier this year, the UNICEF African Children's Fund report that almost all children - ages 7 to 17 - 3.7 million - were missing from school due to the intense security in recent years. Education also refers to children's marriages, lack of female teachers and poor infrastructure as a result of serious problems.

Tehmeena is particularly grateful to the Afghan-Turk School, a private school chain in the country, for her achievements.

"In our schools, we have international education standards with teachers who try to train and educate students in the best way."

Afghan-Turk students are today caught up in an argument between the Turkish government in Ankara and the management of these schools, allegedly linked to Fethullah Gulen, which Turkey says will be punished in 2016. Gullen denies all allegations.

At the request of the Turkish government, Afghanistan has agreed to take control of all Afghan-Turk schools in Ankara, a strong movement by the management of these schools.

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